War Crimes in Bangladesh & Islam

Osham Sufian

Osham Sufian

But a different question is pinching me since last week, when the tribunal issued arrest warrant against the ‘Bacchu Razakar’ alias Abul Kalam Azad. I have been wondering if the Muslims should demand their additional punishment for destroying the religion’s image. Why do I say so?

Running ameer of Jamayat-e-Islami Matiur Rahamn Nizami, Nayebe-e-Ameer Delawar Hossain Sayedee, ex-ameer Ghulam Azam, and three more Jamayat leaders are in jail facing charges of war crimes. Two BNP men, including the `famous’ Chittagong MP Salauddin Quader Chowdhury, are also behind the bar. The other one, Abdul Alim, a member of party’s cabinet under its founder, military strongman Ziaur Rahman, is on conditional bail. You may know, all of them are hooked by the International Crimes Tribunal for their alleged war crimes during 1971.

But a different question is pinching me since last week, when the tribunal issued arrest warrant against the ‘Bacchu Razakar’ alias Abul Kalam Azad. I have been wondering if the Muslims should demand their additional punishment for destroying the religion’s image. Why do I say so?

When the second International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) ordered arrest of Abul Kalam Azad, many of the new generation might have doubted due to the image he has build up by repeated appearances in ‘Islamic’ TV shows. He became popular for a show where he answered questions on Islamic laws or Shariah.

I don’t know what others will say or think, as a Bangladeshi Muslim (though I hardly take part in prayers but feel sad when the image of Islam is damaged), I think of attempts to find a way to try those who damage the image of Islam, despite being ‘more Islamic’ than me.

In 1971, ‘some’ members of a party that has Islam in its name (Jamayat-e-Islami), collaborated with the Pakistani forces to kill their countrymen. Here, the ‘country’ can be referred to an undivided piece of land.

Such a heinous attempt, that can’t be condemned with words dictionaries have, to kill compatriots and rape their sisters, wives and daughters ‘to save Islam’, did nothing but disgraced the religion. They did this with their countrymen even after being ‘followers’ of Muhammad (peace be upon him), whose cry while leaving his motherland for war issues encourages the patriots.

Another issue has to be considered that it was the duty of the Pakistani forces to make their dear motherland Pakistan richer by any mean. There is no way to compare the crimes like genocide they committed with the crimes like murdering, raping and looting neighbors by their collaborators.

Now the Awami League government criticized by many of Bangladeshi Muslims for favoring India, a country of the Hindus, has formed two tribunals to try those crimes against humanity. I hope ‘Islamic scholars’ or ‘any other people’ of the country will find ‘Islamic’ ways to try the collaborators of the Pakistani forces, or Razakar, for destroying the image of Islam in Bangladesh and push backward the religion’s voyage in the country.

If no such significant move in this regard is noticed, I fear Islam is going to lose its image in Bangladesh, where even non-Muslim people know that Islam means peace.

The biggest achievement of the move to try the war criminals is surely the arrest of Ghulam Azam who had allegedly led the infamous, ‘Peace Committees’ and collaborated with the Pakistan Army. He also reportedly advocated in Pakistan’s support in the Middle Eastern countries during the war. He stayed in London for seven years after 1971 and came back to Bangladesh during the rule of Ziaur Rahman in 1978 and led Jamayat as its Ameer until 2000.

On the other hand, the government’s failure to arrest Azad even after a week of the arrest warrant can easily create confusion over Awami League’s eagerness to speed up the war crimes trial. It may disappoint the pro-liberation forces and those who want the trial of the war criminals.

There is a big chance that they discharge Awami League from the position it acquired by pledging war crimes trial.

Meanwhile, it may also impact Awami League’s ‘secular’ image it has built up by restoring the four fundamental principles of the 1972 constitution – nationalism, socialism, democracy and secularism – after over three decades. Pro-liberation forces should remind the new generations that the freedom struggle of the nation was waged to curve out a secular space for the Bangalees from ‘highly fundamental’ Pakistan that discriminates against people of faiths other than Islam.

Military dictators Gen Ziaur Rahman and Hussein Muhammad Ershad had purged Bangladesh of its secular nature by trampling the original constitution of 1972 to appease ‘Islamists’ Matiur Rahman Nizami, Delwar Hossain Sayedee and other leaders of Jamayat to cling to power.


220 Responses to “War Crimes in Bangladesh & Islam”

  1. bangali

    These People are saitan behind the scene, they wearing mask name of Islam and giving bad name on Islam this people are black mark on our society, people how give them name and present them to our society as a good people they are the biggest saitan….

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